Women's Wear Daily

Kate Moss, Lily Allen Attend Dior Men Show

LOCATION LOCATION: Lily Allen was in mock casting-agent mode arriving at the Dior Men show on Friday, with her tell-all, best-selling memoir, “My Thoughts Exactly,” set to be made into a film or TV series. Sporting a silver leopard-print anorak accessorized with a diamond cannabis-shaped necklace she picked up at Icebox in Atlanta, Allen, who is also working on a second book, her fifth album and two musicals, had inadvertently matched her black lipstick to the color of the venue, a sprawling ephemeral structure set on the Champ-de-Mars opposite the École Militaire, with the Eiffel Tower looming in the near distance. When asked who should play her, the singer, who said the format for the adaptation has not yet been decided, shrugged, surveyed the space, and jokingly pointed to the nearest fellow front-rower: Christina Ricci. An unassuming Ricci, a friend of Dior Men creative director Kim Jones who had flown from Los Angeles to support his sophomore outing for the house, was taking in the space. “It’s very impressive to see this big Brutalist tent set against the beauty and elegance of Paris,” she said. Other high-profile guests attending the event included Kate Moss, joined by her beau Count Nikolai von Bismarck; Robert Pattinson and Naomi Campbell. “You’re

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Ojo the Latest Out in Coty’s Ongoing Executive Shake-up

Ukonwa Ojo, the global chief marketing officer of Cover Girl and Sally Hansen, is the latest high-level departure from Coty Inc.’s consumer division. Her exit comes a week after it was announced that Laurent Kleitman, president of the Consumer Beauty division, was being replaced by chief executive officer Pierre Laubies. “We have tremendous respect for Ukonwa and gratitude for her contributions to Coty. During her two years here, she helped build our global marketing team and capabilities and spearheaded brave brand initiatives,” said a Coty spokesperson in a statement confirming her departure to pursue other opportunities. Ojo relocated from her post in London with Unilever in 2016 to join Coty as senior vice president of Cover Girl. She was promoted to chief marketing officer, global Cover Girl, Sally Hansen and Consumer Beauty U.S. last summer. Ojo was instrumental in the relaunch of Cover Girl, as well as the debut of the brand’s own store in Manhattan’s Times Square that she said was inspired by events like Beautycon. Despite the spark Ojo injected into the beauty nameplates, the Consumer Beauty division continues to struggle. Consumer Beauty sales declined last year — down 20.6 percent in the fourth quarter, to $828.8 million. Part of that was

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Drexler Steps Down as Chairman of J. Crew Group to Focus on New Ventures

Millard “Mickey” Drexler has stepped down as chairman of J. Crew Group Inc. and is being succeeded by Chad Leat, another member of the J. Crew board. Drexler, the former chief executive officer of J. Crew, is retiring to devote his full time to Drexler Ventures LLC and other interests. Drexler Ventures was launched in July 2017. Drexler Ventures invests in and advises emerging brands, including Outdoor Voices, which sells men’s and women’s activewear, and Warby Parker, the eyewear company that for every pair of eyeglasses sold, another is donated to a needy person. Drexler owns 10 percent of the J. Crew Group, which is principally owned by TPG Capital and Leonard Green & Partners. With his departure from J. Crew, the 74-year-old Drexler will continue to hold onto his stake and also serve as a strategic adviser to J. Crew’s office of the ceo and the J. Crew Group board. The office of the ceo is running the company and is composed of Michael Nicholson, president and chief operating officer; Adam Brotman, president and chief experience officer; Lynda Markoe, chief administration officer, and Libby Wadle, president of Madewell. The company has been searching for a new ceo since Jim Brett was removed from the

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Tavares Strachan Brings Space Bombers to Paris With CIFF

SPACE MAN: Tavares Strachan is getting into fashion. The Bahamian artist has created a capsule collection and installation of six bomber jackets showing in Paris. “I never thought I’d be producing something that people would wear,” said Strachan at a preview of the installation at the Crillon. “I don’t see this as fashion to me, this is sculpture.” Branded under the name B.A.S.E.C., for the Bahamian Aerospace and Sea Exploration Center Strachan created after undertaking cosmonaut training a few years ago, the project is staged by edgy trade fair CIFF under the tagline “The Northwind Trilogy.” Curated by Neville Wakefield, the three-part project was unveiled at Art Basel Miami in December before hitting Paris and will head to CIFF in Copenhagen at the end of the month. The jackets were created in collaboration with the artist’s mother, and have a social as well as commercial ambition. Crafted by local women, money raised from their sale will be used to fund training initiatives for women in the island nation and inject resources into boosting local production. Fewer than 600 jackets will be produced in total, and they will be offered to select retailers worldwide that can support the installation concept. They will sell for around $2,000

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Thirties, Forties Fashion Focus of Chicago Exhibition

SILVER SIRENS: The influence of Hollywood on American fashion between the Great Depression and World War II will be explored at an upcoming exhibit at the Chicago History Museum. Opening April 8, “Silver Screen to Mainstream: American Fashion in the 1930s and Anna Blessmann ’40s,” will trace how the movies and costume designers help put American fashion on the map. “The exhibition is about Hollywood’s reach, not costume design, so the central concept is how did Hollywood costume design influence fashion,” said Virginia Heaven, curator of the exhibition. “It was profound what Adrian, Howard Greer, Omar Kiam and Irene [Lentz] accomplished in both the movies and mainstream fashion. But they are just a few of the designers that migrated to mainstream fashion from costume design.” Spanning 2,100 square feet, the exhibit will feature 30 ensembles from the museum’s permanent collection. Some of the looks on display will include evening dresses by Chanel, Vionnet, Schiaparelli and Alix, which later became known as Madame Grès. These Parisian designs allude to how the influence of Paris was about to be eclipsed by Hollywood and WWII, Heaven said. The majority of garments are by Americans, including Chicago designers Paul Dupont, who dressed Ruth Page, Blum’s Vogue and Martha Weathered. The

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