Women's Wear Daily

Facebook’s Karin Tracy on Using Technology to Avoid Revenue Loss

By 2020, the U.S. beauty market is expected to be worth $100 billion — just a fraction of the projected $750 billion global beauty market. Brands looking to be major players in the industry should turn to technology to do so, according to Karin Tracy, head of industry, fashion, retail, luxury at Facebook. Tracy outlined how beauty brands should be using technology to reduce the friction points between products and consumers. By 2023, 51 percent of cosmetics and personal care revenue will be generated by online sales. That number is currently 39 percent, 70 percent of which comes from mobile devices. And yet, according to Facebook research, it takes an average of 22 clicks for a person to get to a product online. “That’s 22 reasons for her to walk away from you,” Tracy said. Generation Z, which accounts for one-third of the population, should be at the center of brands’ strategies. “Gen Z is the largest global consumer group out there,” she said. “They are your biggest opportunity, but they can also be your biggest critic.” Gen Z is diverse and multicultural, and spends an average of five hours per day on mobile apps and services, according to Tracy. This age group is primarily focused

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Dr. Barbara Sturm on the ‘New Era’ of Skin Care

For Dr. Barbara Sturm, skin care starts with science. Sturm spoke about her background as an orthopedic surgeon and how she came to launch her eponymous skin-care line. Thanks to her famous vampire facial, she shot to Internet fame through social media organically, without any sponsored content. “It’s not a strategy, it’s not marketing, it’s not paid,” she said of her approach to social media. “I’ve never paid anyone.” Her skin-care philosophy is to eschew of-the-moment products or ingredients — “I don’t follow rules or trends” — and instead focus on anti-inflammation. “Inflammation makes us age, makes us sick, disrupts our tissue,” she said. Inflammation was also at the center of her research for her recently launched skin-care line for darker tones. That line was inspired by the actress Angel Basset, who, according to Sturm, had been raving about her products. Bassett’s praises led Sturm to research post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, which led her to create products that would ultimately address this issue. “There’s a big audience out there,” she said. “Why not give them a product for their needs?” She is now working on a facial mist and a line of products for crepe-y skin that will soon launch in her newly opened New York City-based spa. “It’s a

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Rea Ann Silva on Building Beautyblender

Rea Ann Silva has come a long way since her days doing makeup for the cast of the TV show “Girlfriends.” Silva shared how she founded Beautyblender 15 years go. The idea came to her on the set of “Girlfriends.” She didn’t know how to bring an airbrusher to set, so she decided to use a makeup sponge instead. Beautyblender now sells 17 of its makeup sponges every minute and is one of the most popular beauty brands on social media solely through organic posts. “I never spent one cent on advertising or social media,” Silva said. The company is a 100 percent self-funded business. Silva has no investment partners and, for more than six years, didn’t take a paycheck in order to maintain Beautyblender’s status as completely self-funded. Her business is a family business: her daughter, Erica, is the face of the brand and is responsible for about 80 percent of its social media content. Silva’s husband heads up their joint production company, A Good Egg, which produces content for Beautyblender’s social accounts, as well as for others’. Silva’s brother, Robert, is also Beautyblender’s facilities manager. A makeup artist at heart, Silva refers to her customers and fans as “the everybody artist.” They help guide

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Jane Hertzmark Hudis on Why Beauty Needs a Global Perspective

Succeeding in beauty means having a global perspective, according to Jane Hertzmark Hudis. The Estée Lauder Cos. Inc. group president told the audience that “an amazing curiosity and passion” is what it takes to succeed in beauty today. Hudis also spoke about the importance of having a global perspective, sharing that social media is a window into trends all over the world. “I’m constantly on social media, looking to see not just what my brands are doing or the competition in beauty, but what’s happening in art, design, architecture and all over the world,” she said. “We all have to be globalists and understand what’s happening in China, Japan, Paris, [South] Korea, Florida. We have to know what’s happening all over because trends come from everywhere.” She keeps up with her global teams by communicating with them and traveling. “If you have the opportunity to travel globally, you should,” she said. “You need to see the world to understand what’s happening.” And though it’s important to understand what’s trending globally, it’s not always necessary to apply these trends to your brand, as every brand needs a distinct perspective. “DNA, brand equity is everything and the reason brands can last forever,” Hudis said. Brands often get

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Debbie Perelman Discusses Revlon Now

“Transforming beauty, impacting our world, and beauty with a conscience. In a single sentence, this is Revlon now,” said Debbie Perelman, president and chief executive officer of Revlon. Perelman highlighted the changing nature of the beauty industry, saying it may be “the most exciting time the industry has ever seen.” She credited the beauty innovators who came before, noting that people still like to wear Elizabeth Arden’s red lip. And that she remains inspired by Revlon founder Charles Revson, who used the money from selling his then innovative nail enamel to fund schools and hospitals, and Jan Arnold, the founder of CND, whose “attention to detail and innovation with technology to find gel nail enamel, with our brand shellac, revolutionized the pro nail business and is found on runways around the world.” She also credited Ashley Graham, who she said has taught people to appreciate themselves for who they are and not who they are told to be. “A lot has changed, and a lot will continue to change. One thing will remain the same, and that is there are always opportunities every day to develop and build something better,” Perelman said. “We must transform beauty. We must focus on doing that not only once,

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Beauty Begins in the Belly

Beauty begins in the belly — at least, according to the gospel of Carla Oates, founder of The Beauty Chef. “Did you know that people who have acne and rosacea are 10 times more likely to have gut issues? And that 34 percent of people with Irritable Bowel Syndrome show skin manifestations?” Oates posited to the audience. “Inflammation in the gut is associated with premature aging in the body.” Oates, an Australia native and former beauty editor, realized the impact food can have on skin and well-being at young age. She suffered from allergies and eczema as a child, and a naturopath eliminated processed foods, gluten and dairy from her diet early on. When her daughter displayed symptoms of allergies and eczema, Oates found research that linked gut health to eczema and allergies. “I decided to put my family on a gut-healing protocol — eliminating certain foods from our diet, and introducing gut loving probiotic rich, kefir kimchi and sauerkraut. As I experimented more and more with these foods, I knew I was on to something.”  Oates’ daughter’s allergies improved, and she started getting compliments on her glowing skin. “I started becoming the local pusher and supplier of lacto-fermented foods,” said Oates. The Beauty

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Melisse Shaban’s Virtue Labs Took Six Years to Build a Product

Melisse Shaban was sitting on her deck one day, staring out over the ocean, wondering what her next project should be, when the answer came to her in the form of a phone call. “I was thinking, is 5 o’clock too early for a martini, or should it be 5:30?” Shaban said. Then the beauty industry veteran got a call from Shaun Westfall, now an investment banker with Jefferies, who asked her to take a look at a piece of technology from the ex-chief executive officer of Medtronic, William Hawkins. Turns out, Hawkins was her next door neighbor at the beach. She went to look at the technology and met Luke Burnett, a bio-tissue engineer and colonel in the army. He told her about how the army was good at certain types of care — especially from bullet wounds — but wasn’t able to give that same quality of care for people who were injured by explosives. “We hadn’t caught up to bone, tissue, muscle regeneration, 3-D printing skin, so quality of life for people who had served on our behalf was really a challenge, and Luke dedicated his life to finding devices, drugs and proteins that would help in an effort to improve

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